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Full text of "National Historic Landmarks: Supplement to the 1976 Listings"

National Historic Landmarks 



** 1. 



««* tn the 1976 Listings 




National Historic Landmarks 



A Preservation Program 

of the 
National Park Service 



Supplement to the 1976 Listings 



Historic Sites Survey 

Office of Archeology and Historic Preservation 

National Park Service 

U.S. Department of the Interior 

Washington, D.C. 

1977 



Note on arrangement of entries 

In this listing of the national historic landmarks, the 
following format is used. The historic name of the land- 
mark is given with its location and the historic date or 
historical period involved. This is followed by a short 
statement on the significance of the property. The final 
date given is that on which the property was designated 
as a national historic landmark by the Secretary of the 
Interior. This supplement includes all designations as of 
January 1, 1977. 



Cover: Watchtower, Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, 
Texas. 



Alabama 



CLAYTON, HENRY D., HOUSE, 1 mi. S. of Clayton, 
Barbour County, c. 1850. 

Residence (1857-1929) of the author of the Clayton Anti-Trust Act 
of 1914, an attempt to strengthen the Sherman Act. Advocate of judi- 
cial reform. December 8, 1976. 

MONTGOMERY UNION STATION AND TRAIN- 
SHED, Water and Lee Streets, Montgomery, 
Montgomery County. 1897-1898. 

An excellent example of late 1 9th century commercial architecture, the 
Montgomery Un ion Station is most significant for its trainshed which 
illustrates the adaptation of bridge building techniques to shelter struc- 
tures, an important step in the history of American engineering. 
December 8, 1976. 



Arizona 



FORT HUACHUCA, Fort Huachuca, Cochise County. 
1882-1891. 

Installation central to the campaign to capture famed Indian leader 
Geronimo. Headquarters of all-black regiments from 1892 to 1900 
and again 1928 to 1942. May 11, 1976. 



California 



HEARST SAN SIMEON ESTATE, San Simeon, San Luis 
Obispo County. 1922-1951. 

Residence of William Randolph Hearst who, along with Joseph 
Pulitzer, was a leading practitioner of "yellow journalism." With his 
press sensationalism he built an empire of 37 newspapers and an 
influential news network. May 11, 1976. 

HUBBLE, EDWIN, HOUSE, 1340 Woodstock Road, San 
Marino, San Marino County. 1925. 

Home of one of America's greatest 20th century astronomers who, 
among other accomplishments, discovered extragalactic nebulae and 
their recession from each other. December 8, 1976. 

MARE ISLAND NAVAL SHIPYARD, Vallejo, Solano 
County. 1854. 

U.S. Navy's first permanent installation on the Pacific Coast, it sym- 
bolizes the Nation's effort to extend its power into the Pacific Ocean. 
The first U.S. warship (1859) and first drydock (1872-91) con- 
structed on the West Coast. May 15, 1975. 



Connecticut 



CHITTENDEN, RUSSELL HENRY, HOUSE, 83 Trum- 
bull Street, New Haven, New Haven County. 1880's. 

Often called the father of American biochemistry, as director of Yale's 
Sheffield Scientific School contributed to establishing biochemistry as a 
major biological discipline. May 15, 1975. 

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Farmington, Hartford 
County. 1771. 

As the center of the community life of the Amistad captives after their 
famous 1840-1841 trial, the First Church of Christ commemorates 
the importance of this famous trial in the history of the abolition move- 
ment. December 8, 1976. 

MENDEL, LAFAYETTE B., HOUSE, 18 Trumbull 
Street, New Haven, New Haven County. 1880's. 

Home of the distinguished early 20th century Yale biochemist who 
contributed to the identification of vitamins and who performed 
pioneering research on proteins and nutrition in general. January 7, 
1976. 

MORLEY, EDWARD W., HOUSE, 26 Westland Ave- 
nue, West Hartford, Hartford County. 1906. 

Home of the chemist Edward W. Morley who in 1887 collaborated 
with Albert A. Michelson in measuring the speed of light and who in 
1895 determined the atomic weights of hydrogen and oxygen. May 
15, 1975. 

NORTON, CHARLES H., HOUSE, 132 Redstone Hill, 
Plainville, Hartford County. 1922. 

Later-day home of the inventor of heavy duty precision grinding ma- 
chines which have become integral to modern industrial technology. 
May 11, 1976. 



District of Columbia 



ABBE, CLEVELAND, HOUSE, 2017 I Street, N.W., 
Washington. 1805. 

Over 30 years residence of a prominent 19th century meteorologist 
known as the father of the United States Weather Service. May 15, 
1975. 

BAKER, NEWTON D., HOUSE, 3017 N Street, N.W., 
Washington. 1794. 

Residence (1916-1920) of one of the finest Secretaries of Wa r; he pre- 
sided over the Nation's World War I mobilization. Prime proponent 
of the Wilson concept of world involvement during the 1920 's. 
December 8, 1976. 



CONNECTICUT / DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

BORAH, WILLIAM E., APARTMENT, WINDSOR 
LODGE, 2139-2141, Wyoming Avenue, N.W., Wash- 
ington, c. 1913. 

Residence (1913-1929) of leading Republican progressive. He was 
the most powerful force in foreign affairs during the 1 920 's. Leader of 
the irreconcilables who defeated President Wilson's League of Nations. 
December 8, 1976. 

BRUCE, BLANCHE K., HOUSE, 909 M Street, N.W., 
Washington. 1865. 

As Senator from Mississippi, Bruce was the first black American to 
serve a full term in the United States Senate (1875-1881). May 1 5, 
1975. 

CARY, MARY ANN SHADD, HOUSE, 1421 W Street, 
N.W., Washington. Date unknown. 

Home of the first black female journalist who lectured widely in the 
cause of abolition and who after the Civil War became the first black 
female lawyer. December 8, 1976. 

COUES, ELLIOTT, HOUSE, 1726 N Street, N.W., 
Washington. 1880's. 

Home of a leading 1 9th century ornithologist whose studies greatly ex- 
panded the knowledge of North American bird life. May 15, 1975. 

GRIMKE, CHAROLETTE FORTEN, HOUSE, 1608 R 
Street, N.W., Washington, c. 1880. 

Home of a pioneer black educator best known for her work among the 
black community of Port Royal, South Carolina, between 1862 and 
1864. May 11, 1976. 

JOHNSON, HIRAM W., HOUSE, 122 Maryland Ave- 
nue, N.E., Washington, c. 1810. 

Residence (l 929-4 7) of a leading voice of the Progressive movement. 
Called for the formation of the Progressive Party in 1912. As Gover- 
nor of California he had adopted more progressive legislation than 
elsewhere in the Nation. December 8, 1976. 

ANDREW MELLON BUILDING, 1785 Massachusetts 
Avenue, N.W., Washington, c. 1906. 

Residence (1 922-3 7) of millionaire industrialist and Secretary of the 
Treasury from 1921 to 1932, the longest cabinet tenure since Albert 
Gallatin. Authored the "Mellon Plan" which stimulated the 
economic boom of the 1920's. May 11, 1976. 

SAINT LUKE'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 15th and 
Church Streets, N.W., Washington. 1879. 

Church founded and led by Alexander Crummell, 1 9th century black 
leader who early espoused the necessity for blacks to cultivate an edu- 
cated cadre that would lead black Americans to civil rights and 
equality. May 11, 1976. 

TERRELL, MARY CHURCH, HOUSE, 326 T Street, 
N.W., Washington. 1907. 

Residence of the civil rights leader who achieved national prominence 
as the first president of the National Association of Colored Women. 
May 15, 1975. 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA / FLORIDA 

UNDERWOOD, OSCAR W., HOUSE, 2000 G Street, 
N.W., Washington. 19th century. 

Residence (1914-25) of House Democratic leader after the 1910 
election and Democratic presidential contender in 1912. Author of 
what has been called the most equitable tariff since 1861 — the 
Underwood-Simmons Tariff of 1913. December 8, 1976. 

U.S. MARINE CORPS BARRACKS AND COM- 
MANDANT'S HOUSE, 801 G Street, S.E., Washington. 
1903, 1907; 1801-1934. 

Nation's oldest continuously active Marine Corps installation. Corps 
headquarters from 1801 to 1901. Home of the Marine Band, the 
official White House musical unit. May 11, 1976. 

WASHINGTON NAVY YARD, 8th and M Streets, S.E., 
Washington. 1800-1910. 

The Nation's first yard and first home port. Center for early 19th cen- 
tury naval operations during a critical period of expanding na- 
tionalism. May 11, 1976. 

WHITE, DAVID, HOUSE, 1459 Girard Street, N.W., 
Washington. 1890 / s. 

Home of distinguished United States Geological Survey geologist best 
remembered as a leading expert on the origin and evolution of coal and 
as the author of a theory of oil distribution basic to the petroleum in- 
dustry. January 7 , 1976. 

WOODSON, CARTER G., HOUSE, 1538 Ninth Street, 
N.W., Washington, c. 1890. 

Home of the founder of black history studies in the United States; 
Woodson guided the establishment of the Association for the Study of 
Negro Life and the "Journal of Negro History." May 11, 1976. 

WOODSON, ROBERT SIMPSON, HOUSE, 1513 16th 
Street, N.W., Washington. 1880's. 

Washington home of a leading late 1 9th century geologist and mathe- 
matician who was the first president of the Carnegie Institution. 
January 7, 1976. 



Florida 



BRITISH FORT, six miles southwest of Sumatra, Frank- 
lin County. 1814. 

Place where runaway slaves lived alongside Seminole Indians which, 
when destroyed in 1816, precipitated the First Seminole War. May 
15, 1975. 

PENSACOLA NAVAL AIR STATION HISTORIC DIS- 
TRICT, Pensacola, Escambia County. 1914-1919. 

United States' first permanent naval air station, first navy pilot train- 
ing center, and first naval installation to send pilots into combat. 
December 8, 1976. 



FLORIDA / GEORGIA 

TAMPA BAY HOTEL, 401 West Kennedy Boulevard, 
Tampa, Hillsborough County. 1888-1891. 

Headquarters of the army that invaded Cuba in the Spanish- 
American War. News center for journalists participating in the 
"Correspondents' War." Hotel was a pioneering effort in the Florida 
resort business. Excellent example of Moorish-Turkish Revival archi- 
tecture. May 11, 1976. 



Georgia 



CENTRAL OF GEORGIA DEPOT AND TRAINSHED, 
West Broad Street at Liberty, Savannah, Chatham 
County. 1860-1866, 1876 

Early attempt to build a comprehensive railroad terminal and shop 
complex. The trainshed is the oldest remaining example of early iron 
roof construction, the first step in the evolution of modern steel building 
methods. December 8, 1976. 

FOX THEATRE, 660 Peachtree Street, Atlanta, Fulton 
County. 1929, Mayre, Alger and Vinour. 

Known as "The Fabulous Fox," designed in Mid-Eastern style, it is 
one of the great movie palaces of the 1920's era. May 11, 1976. 

GRADY, HENRY W., HOUSE, 634 Prince Avenue, 
Athens, Clarke County, c. 1845. 

Home (1863-1872) of a major proponent of national reconciliation 
during the post-Civil War era. Delivered his famous "New South" 
speech in 1886 in New York City. May 11, 1976. 

GREEN-MELDRIM HOUSE, Bull and Harvis Streets, 
Madison Square, Savannah, Chatham County. 1850- 
1854, John S. Norris. 

Built for the Green family, Gothic Revival in style, it was General 
Sherman's headquarters from 1864-1865. May 11, 1976. 

OWENS-THOMAS HOUSE, 125 Abercorn Street, 
Savannah, Chatham county. 1816-1819. 

English Regency in style, beautifully furnished, the house was 
designed by William jay. May 11, 1976. 

SWEET AUBURN HISTORIC DISTRICT, Atlanta, Ful- 
ton County. Early 20th century. 

As the center of black economic, social, and cultural activities in 
Atlanta from the 1890's to the 1930's, the Sweet Auburn District 
reflects an important element in the life of the Afro-American com- 
munity in a segregated South. December 8, 1976. 

TELFAIR ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, 121 
Barnard Street, Telfair Square, Savannah, Chatham 
County. 1818-1820, Museum conversion in 1880 / s, 
William Jay and Carl N. Brandt. 

An early Southeastern museum that combines the 1818 house with 
the later museum wing. May 11, 1976. 



GEORGIA / HAWAII / ILLINOIS 

WATSON, THOMAS E., HOUSE, 310 Lumpkin Street, 
Thompson, McDuffie County, c. 1875. 

Watson was a principal founder of the Populist Party and first to urge 
a united front between white and black farmers. Embitter -ment from 
defeat at the polls in 1892 and 1 896, led to a reversal of his progres- 
sive racial attitudes and gave him an important following of Southern 
rural whites. May 11, 1976. 



Hawaii 



KALAUPAPA LEPROSY SETTLEMENT, Molokai 
Island, Kalowao County. 1866. 

Location of Hawaii's well-known leprosarium where the Belgian 
priest Father Joseph Damien, ministered to the lepers and gained 
worldwide fame. January 7, 1976. 



Illinois 



ABBOTT, ROBERT S., HOUSE, 4742 Martin Luther 
King Drive, Chicago, Cook County. Date unknown. 

Home of the founder of the "Chicago Defender," a leading black news- 
paper, and a man called the founder of the modern Negro press. 
December 8, 1976. 

AUDITORIUM BUILDING, 430 South Michigan Ave- 
nue, Chicago, Cook County. 1889. 

Now the property of Roosevelt University, it is the work of Adlerand 
Sullivan and is one of the most important buildings in the history of 
modern architecture. May 15, 1975. 

CARSON, PIRIE SCOTT AND COMPANY STORE, 
State and Madison Streets, Chicago, Cook County. 
1899, 1904-1906. 

A dry goods palace designed by Louis Sullivan in an original and 
practical form. Addition by Daniel H. Burnham. May 15, 1975. 

COMPTON, ARTHUR H., HOUSE, 5637 Woodlawn 
Avenue, Chicago, Cook County. 1916. 

Residence of the distinguished physicist who, while at the University 
of Chicago, discovered the "Compton Effect" for which he received the 
1927 Nobel Prize in physics. May 11, 1976. 

DANA, SUSAN LAWRENCE, HOUSE, 301 Lawrence 
Avenue, Springfield, Sangamon County. 1902-1906. 

One of the masterpieces of Frank Lloyd Wright's early period; it still 
contains much of its original furniture and stained glass. January 7, 
1976. 



ILLINOIS 

DAVIS, DAVID, HOUSE, 1000 E. Monroe Street, 
Bloomington, McLean County. 1870. 

Associate Justice of the Supreme Court David Davis wrote the ma- 
jority opinion in ex parte Milligan limiting military jurisdiction 
in civilian affairs. May 15, 1975. 

DAWES, CHARLES G., HOUSE, 225 Greenwood 
Street, Evanston, Cook County. 1894. 

Residence (1909-1951) of the 1925 winner of the Nobel Peace Prize 
for the Dawes Plan — a rational schedule of World War 1 reparations 
to be paid by Germany. First Director of the Budget, he put the Bud- 
get Bureau on a sound basis. December 8, 1976. 

DEPRIEST, OSCAR STANTON, HOUSE, 4536-4538 
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Drive, Chicago, Cook 
County. 1920's. 

Residence of the first black American elected to the House of Represen- 
tatives from a Northern State (1928-1935). May 15, 1975. 

DU SABLE, JEAN BAPTISTE POINT, HOMESITE, 401 
North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Cook County. 1779. 

Site of the home of the black fur trader and pioneer whose establish- 
ment of a trading post at this location marked the beginning of the city 
of Chicago. May 11, 1976. 

GLESSNER, JOHN J., HOUSE, 1800 Prairie Avenue, 
Chicago, Cook County. 1885-1887. 

Designed by Henry Hobson Richardson late in his career, it was com- 
missioned by John Glessner, President of International Harvester. 
January 7, 1976. 

KENNICOTT GROVE, Glenview, Cook County. 1856. 

Home of Robert Kennicott, mid-1 9th century naturalist, explorer, 
and founder of the Chicago Academy of Sciences, whose career illus- 
trates the spread of scientific interest and activity to the Midwest. 
January 7, 1976. 

LEITER II BUILDING, South State and East Congress 
Streets, Chicago, Cook County. 1889-1891. 

Now Sears, Roebuck and Company, this building is the masterpiece of 
William Le Baron Jenny. January 7, 1976. 

LILLIE, FRANK R., HOUSE, 5801 Kenwood Avenue, 
Chicago, Cook County. 1904. 

Forty-three year home of the distinguished University of Chicago 
embryologist, Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory director, 
and National Academy of Sciences president. May 11, 1976. 

MARQUETTE BUILDING, 140 South Dearborn Street, 
Chicago, Cook County. 1893-1894. 

William Holabird and Martin Roche, architects, made their first 
decisive statement on a new concept in building — steel framing. 
January 7, 1976. 

MILLIKAN, ROBERT A., HOUSE, 5605 Woodlawn 
Avenue, Chicago, Cook County. 1907. 

One of America's best known 20th century scientists, Millikan 



ILLINOIS / INDIANA 



received the 1923 Nobel Prize in physics for his work in proving the 
existence of electrons. May 11, 1976. 

RELIANCE BUILDING, 32 North State Street, Chicago, 
Cook County. 1890-1895, Burnham and Root. 

This "Chicago School" building is one of the key monuments in the 
development of modern architecture. January 7, 1976. 

ROOKERY BUILDING, 209 South LaSalle Street, 
Chicago, Cook County. 1886-1888. 

One of the last great masonry structures of the 1 9th century, designed 
by Daniel Burnham and John W. Root. May 15, 1975. 

SOUTH DEARBORN STREET-PRINTING HOUSE 
ROW NORTH HISTORIC DISTRICT, Jackson 
Boulevard, Plymouth and Federal Courts, Dearborn and 
Congress Streets, Chicago, Cook County. 

The district includes the Manhattan (1891), the Fisher (1896), the 
Old Colony (1894), and the Monadnock (1880-1891) buildings. 
The group form a district illustrating the "Chicago School" of 
architecture. The Monadnock is a triumph of unified design called 
"classic" by critics. January 7, 1976. 

TRUMBULL, LYMAN, HOUSE, 1105 Henry Street, 
Alton, Madison County, c. 1849. 

An arch-opponent of the Radical Republicans, Trumbull sponsored 
much Reconstruction legislation including the Confiscation Acts, 
Freedmen's Bureau Bill of 1866, and the Civil Rights Act of 1866. 
May 15, 1975. 

WILLIAMS, DANIEL HALE, HOUSE, 445 East 42nd 
Street, Chicago, Cook County. 1905. 

Home of one of America's first black surgeons, among whose accom- 
plishments were one of the first successful heart operations in 1893 
and the establishment of quality medical facilities for blacks. May 15, 
1975. 

WRIGHT, FRANK LLOYD, HOME AND STUDIO, 428 
Forest Avenue and 951 Chicago Avenue, Oak Park, 
Cook County. 1889-1898. 

Built and rebuilt, it is here that Wright lived and practiced in the 
"First Golden Age" of his long career. January 7, 1976. 



Indiana 



WALLACE, GENERAL LEW, STUDY, Pike Street and 
Wallace Avenue, Crawfordsville, Montgomery County. 

1895-98. 

Used by the author of Ben Hur from 1898 to 1905. As a Union 
general he played an important part at the victory of Fort Donelson 
and the action at Monocacy, Md. During Reconstruction he was an 
influential progressive Republican. May 11, 1976. 



Iowa 



HEPBURN, WILLIAM P., HOUSE, 321 West Lincoln 
Street, Clarinda, Page County, c. 1867. 

Residence (c. 1867-c. 1916) of Congressman who introduced the 
Hepburn Act (1906) giving the government the power to set railroad 
rates — a precedent in Federal control of private industry . December 8, 
1976. 

MERCHANTS' NATIONAL BANK, Fourth Avenue and 
Broad Street, Grinnell, Poweshiek County. 1914. 

One of the best preserved of the small banks designed by Louis Sulli- 
van late in his career. January 7, 1976. 

OLD CAPITOL, Campus center, University of Iowa, 
Iowa City, Johnson County. 1842-1846. 

Iowa's first permanent capiiol although built as the third territorial 
capitol. Designed by ]ohn F. Rague. January 7, 1976. 

VAN ALLEN AND COMPANY DEPARTMENT 
STORE, Fifth Avenue and South Second Street, Clin- 
ton, Clinton County. 1913-1915. 

One of the dwindling number of buildings by Louis Sullivan in the 
Midwest; done at the end of his career. January 7, 1976. 

WEAVER, JAMES B., HOUSE, Weaver Park Road, 
Bloomfield, Davis County, c. 1865. 

Long-time home of the Populist candidate for President and anti- 
monopolist. Proponent of the graduated income tax and a principal 
sponsor of free coinage of silver. May 15, 1975. 



Kansas 



NATION, CARRY A., HOUSE, 211 West Fowler Ave- 
nue, Medicine Lodge, Barber County, c. 1882. 

Residence (1889-1902) of saloon-destroying hatchet wielder who be- 
came the formost symbol of a reinvigorated prohibition movement 
during the turn of the 20th century. May 11, 1976. 

NICODEMUS HISTORIC DISTRICT, Nicodemus, 
Graham County. 1877. 

Only remaining town of the black "Exoduster" movement out of the 
South to the Midwest in the hope of finding a better life. January 7, 
1976. 



KANSAS / LOUISIANA / MAINE / MARYLAND 



WHITE, WILLIAM ALLEN, HOUSE, 927 Exchange 
Street, Emporia, Lyon County, c. 1887. 

Home (1899-1944) of internationally renowned journalist and 
author whose writings had a marked effect on the political and social 
life of the country. His book The Old Order Changeth (1910) 
expressed the dominant view of the progressive movement. May 1 1, 
1976. 



Louisiana 



UNITED STATES MINT, NEW ORLEANS BRANCH, 
420 Esplanade Avenue, New Orleans, Orleans Parish. 
1835-1861, William Strickland. 

This branch mint is the Nation s oldest unreconstructed extant mint in 
its original location. May 15, 1975. 

WHITE, EDWARD DOUGLAS, HOUSE, 5 mi. N. of 
Thibodaux Lafourche Parish, c. 1790. 

Residence (1 845-1921) of Associate and Chief Justice of the Supreme 
Court (1894-1 92 1) who wrote over 700 opinions. His greatest im- 
pact was made with his "rule of reason" in the enforcement of anti- 
trust cases. December 8, 1976. 



Maine 



REED, THOMAS B., HOUSE, 30-32 Deering Street, 
Portland, Cumberland County. 1876. 

Residence (1888-1902) of "Czar Reed," powerful Speaker of the 
House, who in 1890 reformed House procedures with the "Reed 
Rules." May 15, 1975. 



Maryland 



McCOLLUM, ELMER V., HOUSE, 2301 Monticello 
Road, Baltimore, Baltimore County, c. 1920. 

Residence of a Johns Hopkins biochemist who discovered vitamins A, 
B, and D and outlined the roles vitamins play in nutrition. January 7, 
1976. 

MOUNT ROYAL STATION AND TRAINSHED, 1400 
Cathedral Street, Baltimore City. 1894-1896. 

One of the last gable roof trainsheds built in the United States, the 
Mount Royal Station is an excellent example of the harmonious blend- 
ing of engineering and aesthetic values. December 8, 1976. 



10 



MARYLAND / MASSACHUSETTS 

REMSEN, IRA, HOUSE, 214 Monument Street, Balti- 
more, Baltimore County. 1880's. 

As researcher, as author of widely used chemistry textbooks, and as 
President of Johns Hopkins University, Remsen was a major influ- 
ence in American science at the turn of the century. May 15, 1975. 

ROWLAND, HENRY AUGUST, HOUSE, 915 Cathedral 
Street, Baltimore, Baltimore County. 1880's. 

Home of America's best known and most accomplished 19th century 
physicist. May 15, 1975. 

WELCH, WILLIAM HENRY, HOUSE, 935 St. Paul 
Street, Baltimore, Baltimore County. lSStfs. 

From 1891 to 1908 the home of the distinguished Johns Hopkins pro- 
fessor who transformed American medical research and teaching and 
became known as the dean of American medical science. January 7, 
1976. 



Massachusetts 



BALDWIN, MARIA, HOUSE, 196 Prospect Street, 
Cambridge, Middlesex County. 1840 / s. 

Home of an outstanding black educator who as Master of Cam- 
bridge's Agassiz School established a national reputation. May 11, 
1976. 

BIRKHOFF, GEORGE D., HOUSE, 22 Craigie, Cam- 
bridge, Middlesex County. 1890's. 

Residence of the leading American mathematician during the first 
quarter of the 20th century. May 15, 1975. 

BRIDGMAN, PERCY W., HOUSE, 10 Buckingham 
Place, Cambridge, Middlesex County, c. 1920. 

Distinguished teacher and physicist who in 1946 received the Nobel 
Prize for his invention of an apparatus for obtaining very high pres- 
sures and for his discoveries in the field of high pressure physics. May 
15, 1975. 

COUNT RUMFORD BIRTHPLACE, 90 Elm Street, 
Woburn, Middlesex County. 1714. 

Benjamin Thompson, the name of the later Count Rumford, was the 
first native-born American to gain international recognition for his 
contributions to science when in 1798 he disproved the prevailing 
caloric theory of the nature of heat. May 15, 1975. 

DALY, REGINALD A, HOUSE, 23 Hawthorn Street, 
Cambridge, Middlesex County. 1880's. 

Home of 20th century Harvard geologist who investigated the entire 
spectrum of geology and who enjoyed an international reputation. 
January 7, 1976. 



11 



MASSACHUSETTS 

DAVIS, WILLIAM M., HOUSE, 17 Francis Avenue, 
Cambridge, Middlesex County. 1880's. 

Residence of outstanding Harvard geologist and geographer whose 
work in the late 19th century and early 20th on the forces that shape 
the earth established the discipline of geomorphology . January 7, 
1976. 

DUBOIS, WILLIAM E. B., BOYHOOD HOMESITE, 
Route 23, Great Barrington, Berkshire County. 1868. 

Site of the boyhood home of the prominent black sociologist and writer 
who was a major figure in the Negro civil rights movement during the 
first half of the 20th century. May 1 1, 1976. 

FESSENDEN, REGINALD A., HOUSE, 45 Waban Hill 
Road, Newton, Middlesex County. 1919. 

Residence of the multifaceted inventor who was the first to broadcast 
the human voice and who made other major contributions to the 
development of radio. January 7 , 1976. 

LITTLE, ARTHUR D., INC., BUILDING, 30 Memorial 
Drive, Cambridge, Middlesex County. 1917. 

Arthur D. Little, Inc. is the first and most successful independent con- 
sulting laboratory, known for numerous contributions to science and 
engineering. December 8, 1976. 

LODGE, HENRY CABOT, RESIDENCE, 5 Cliff Street, 
Nahant, Essex County. 19th century. 

Residence (1850-1924) of one of the most influential congressional 
spokesmen on foreign affairs from 1887 to 1924. Advocate of the 
"large policy" — modernizing the navy, acquiring territories, and 
building the Panama Canal. December 8, 1976. 

MINOT, GEORGE R., HOUSE, 71 Sears Road, Brook- 
line, Middlesex County. 1920's. 

Home of the distinguished physiologist and co-winner of the Nobel 
Prize in medicine and physiology for his 1926 discovery that eating 
liver could cure pernicious anemia. January 7, 1976. 

NELL, WILLIAM C, RESIDENCE, 3 Smith Court, 
Boston, Suffolk County. Date unknown. 

Home of William C. Nell, from the 18 30s to the end of the Civil War 
a leading black abolitionist and spokesman for his race. May 11, 
1976. 

RICHARDS, THEODORE W., HOUSE, 15 Follen 
Street, Cambridge, Middlesex County. 1900. 

Long-time home of Harvard chemist who in 1914 received the Nobel 
Prize in chemistry for his work in determining atomic weights and 
who is considered to have been the foremost experimental chemist of his 
time. January 7, 1976. 

THOMSON, ELIHU, HOUSE, 33 Elmwood Avenue, 
Swampscott, Essex County. 1890. 

Home and laboratory of a prolific inventor and one of the founders of 
the General Electric Company. January 7, 1976. 



12 



MASSACHUSETTS / MICHIGAN / MINNESOTA 

TROTTER, WILLIAM MONROE, HOUSE, 97 Sawyer 
Avenue, Suffolk County, c. 1890. 

Home of the noted black journalist and militant civil rights activist 
during the first decades of the 20th century. May 11, 1976. 



Michigan 



DOW, HERBERT H., HOUSE, 1038 West Main Street, 
Midland, Midland County. 1899. 

For many years home of the father of Dow Chemical Corporation and 
the inventor of highly successful methods for exploiting brine. May 
11, 1976. 

PARKE-DAVIS RESEARCH LABORATORY, Foot of 
Joseph Campau at the River, Detroit, Wayne County. 
1902. 

The first industrial research laboratory in the United States built for 
the specific purpose of conducting pharmacological research. May 1 1, 
1976. 



Minnesota 



KELLOGG, FRANK B., HOUSE, 633 Fairmont Avenue, 
St. Paul, Ramsey County. Late 19th century. 

Secretary of State from 1925 to 1929, he negotiated the Kellogg- 
Briand Pact of 1928 for which he received the Nobel Peace Prize. 
Moved foreign policy away from interventionism. December 8, 
1976. 

LINDBERGH, CHARLES A., SR., HOUSE, Morrison 
County Road 52, vicinity Little Falls, Morrison County. 
1906-1907. 

Residence (1907-1920) of Congressman who was a reformer and 
independent. An agrarian progressive, he was prominent in protest 
politics — fought interventionism, and the eastern bankers. Home of 
his famous aviator son. December 8, 1976. 

NATIONAL FARMER'S BANK, Broadway and Cedar 
Streets, Owatonna, Steele County. 1907-1908. 

Probably the finest of the late, small midwestern banks by Louis Henry 
Sullivan. January 7, 1976. 

VOLSTEAD, ANDREW J., 163 Ninth Avenue, Granite 
Falls, Yellow Medicine County. 1878. 

Home (1894-1930) of the man who "personified prohibition." 
Drafted the 1919 National Prohibition Enforcement Act, known as 
the Volstead Act. December 8, 1976. 



13 



Mississippi 



LAMAR, LUCIUS Q. C, HOUSE, 616 N. 14th Street, 
Oxford, Lafayette County, c. 1860. 

Lamar was a leading Southern spokesman for reconciliation during 
Reconstruction. Exponent of Southern industrial progress and leader 
of the "New South" movement. May 15, 1975. 

MONTGOMERY, I. T., HOUSE, West Main Street, 
Mound Bayou, Bolivar County. 1910. 

Home of Isaiah Thornton Montgomery, who in 1887 founded the 
town of Mound Bayou as a place where black Americans could obtain 
social, political, and economic rights in a white supremacy South. 
May 11, 1976. 

OAKLAND MEMORIAL CHAPEL, Alcorn University, 
Alcorn, Claiborne County. 1838. 

Oldest and most venerable building on the Alcorn University cam- 
pus, Oakland Chapel symbolizes the importance of Alcorn as the first 
black land grant college in the United States. May 11, 1976. 

PEMBPERTONS HEADQUARTERS, 1018 Crawford 
Street, Vicksburg, Warren County. 1836. 

Headquarters of Confederate General ]ohn J. Pemberton during the 
1863 siege of Vicksburg and place where the fateful decision to 
surrender was made. December 8, 1976. 



Missouri 



CLARK, "CHAMP/' HOUSE, 204 East Champ Clark 
Dr., Bowling Green, Pike County. 19th century. 

Residence (1899-1921) of one of the great Speakers of the House. In 
defeating Speaker Cannon in 1911 he recreated the position of 
Speaker, making it responsive and responsible. December 8, 1976. 

ERLANGER, JOSEPH, HOUSE, 5127 Waterman Boule- 
vard, St. Louis, St. Louis County. 1903. 

Home of one of the founders of American physiology in the first 
quarter of the 20th century who shared the 1944 Nobel Prize in 
medicine and physiology for his discovery of the electrical nature of the 
human nervous system. December 8, 1976. 

JOPLIN, SCOTT, RESIDENCE, 2685-A Morgan, St. 
Louis, St. Louis County. 1890's. 

The last surviving residence of Scott Joplin, the king of ragtime and 
one of the most creative black musicians of the late 1 9 th and early 20th 
centuries. December 8, 1976. 

MISSOURI BOTANICAL GARDEN, 2345 Tower 
Grove Avenue, St. Louis, St. Louis County. 1859. 

Oldest functioning botanical garden in the United Statesjong famous 



14 



MONTANA / NEBRASKA / NEW HAMPSHIRE 



for the quality of its flora displays and for the high quality of its 
botanical and horticultural research. December 8, 1976. 

PERSHING, GENERAL JOHN J., BOYHOOD HOME, 
Worlow and State Streets, Laclede, Linn County, c. 1858. 

General Pershing was a hero of World War 1 and architect of a new 
army. Organized the largest army in the U.S. history to that time; it 
turned the tide in 1918 and effected the armistice. 
May 11, 1976. 



Montana 



RANKIN RANCH, 30 mi. E. of Helena, Avalanche 
Gulch, Broadwater County. 1923. 

Residence of Jeanette Rankin (1 923-1956), first woman in the world 
ever elected to a national representative body. Elected to the House of 
Representatives in 1916. Best remembered for her pacifism, she 
played an important role in women's rights and social reform 
movements. May 11, 1976. 

WHEELER, BURTON K., HOUSE, 1232 E. Second 
Street, Butte, Silver Bow County, c. 1900. 

Montana home (1908-1923) of Senate radical during the 1920's 
and 1930's. First prominent Democrat to support F.D.R. for the 
Presidency, he later broke with Roosevelt over the court-packing plan 
and lend lease. December 8, 1976. 



Nebraska 



MORTON, J. STERLING, HOUSE, Centennial Ave- 
nue, Nebraska City, Otoe County. 1855, enlarged 
several times through 1903. 

Residence (1855-1902) of the founder of Arbor Day. As Secretary of 
Agriculture he introduced new areas of research. May 15, 1975. 

STATE CAPITOL, 1445 K Street, Lincoln, Lancaster 
County. 1922-1932. 

Designed by Bertram Goodhue as a "classical skyscraper," it is 
lavishly ornamented with sculpture. January 7, 1976. 



New Hampshire 



CHASE, SALMON P., BIRTHPLACE AND BOY- 
HOOD HOME, Route 12-A, Cornish, Sullivan County, 
c. 1790. 

Childhood home (1808-c. 1816) of the Chief Justice of the Supreme 
Court, Senator and Secretary of the Treasury. Presided over the im- 
peachment trial of Andrew Johnson. May 15, 1975. 



15 



New Jersey 



ABBOTT FARM HISTORIC DISTRICT, Trenton, Mer- 
cer County, c. 500 B.C.-A.D. 500. 

Largest and richest known Middle Woodland village archeological 
site in the coastal Mid-Atlantic/New England region. In addition the 
interpretation of the data from Abbot Farm played a significant role in 
the development of archeology in this century. December 8, 1976. 

CAPE MAY HISTORIC DISTRICT, Southern end of 
Garden State Parkway, Cape May County. 1840's- 
1920's. 

One of the largest collections (600 or more) of late 1 9th century sea- 
shore houses and hotels. May 11, 1976. 

FORTUNE, T. THOMAS, HOUSE, 94 West Bergen 
Place, Red Bank, Monmouth County. Date unknown. 

From 1901 to 1 91 5 the home of the crusading black journalist who in 
his newspapers articulated the cause of Negro rights at the turn of the 
20th century. December 8, 1976. 

GREAT FALLS OF THE PASSAIC S.U.M. HISTORIC 
DISTRICT, Paterson, Passaic County. 1792-1912. 

Site of the first attempt in the United States to harness the entire power 
of a major river for industrial purposes. Remains include original 
raceway and later hydroelectric plant. May 11, 1976. 

LUCY, THE MARGATE ELEPHANT, Margate City, 
Atlantic County. 1881. 

Designed and patented by James V. Lafferty, the elephant-hotel is the 
last one extant of this type of architectural folly. May 11, 1976. 

OLD QUEENS, RUTGERS UNIVERSITY, Rutgers cam- 
pus, New Brunswick, Middlesex County. 1808-1809. 

Designed by John McComb, Jr., in the Federal style, this is the origi- 
nal college building. May 11, 1976. 

STANTON, ELIZABETH CADY, HOUSE, 135 High- 
wood Avenue, Tenafly, Bergen County, c. 1868. 

Residence (1868-1887) of early proponent, philosopher, and leader 
of the women's rights movement. Delivered the call for female suffrage 
at the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848. May 15, 1975. 



New Mexico 



VILLAGE OF COLUMBUS AND CAMP FURLONG, 
Columbus, Luna County. 1916-1917. 

Scene of "Pancho" Villa's attack on March 9, 1916, and assembly for 
Gen. John J. Pershing's reprisal action 300 miles into Mexico. May 
15, 1975. 



16 



New York 



ARMOR-STINER HOUSE, 45 West Clinton Avenue, 
Irvington, Westchester County. 1859-1860, enlarged 
1875-1876. 

Reflecting the theories of Orson Squire Fowler, it is the only 
fully-domed octagon residence in America. For many years the home 
of the author Carl Carmer. December 8, 1976. 

ARMSTRONG, EDWIN H., HOUSE, 1032 Warburton 
Avenue, Yonkers, Westchester County. 1902. 

Early home and laboratory of a major figure in the history of radio 
among whose inventions was frequency modulation, or FM broad- 
casting. January 7, 1976. 

ARMSTRONG, LOUIS, HOUSE, 3456 107th Street, 
Corona, Long Island, Queens County, c. 1900. 

For years the home of the famous jazz musician whose talents enter- 
tained millions throughout the world. May 11, 1976. 

BARTOW-PELL MANSION, Pelham Bay Park, Shore 
Road near Bartow Circle, Bronx, Bronx County. 1836- 
1842. 

Greek Revival Federal house museum in the style of Minard Lafever. 
December 8, 1976. 

BAYARD-CONDICT BUILDING, 65-69 Bleeker 
Street, New York, Manhattan County. 1897-1899. 

One of the first skyscrapers in New York City, it is the only work by 
Louis Sullivan in the East except for the Prudential Building in Buf- 
falo. December 8, 1976. 

BELL TELEPHONE LABORATORIES, 463 West Street, 
New York City. 1898. 

From 1898 to 1966 the home of America's largest industrial re- 
search laboratory responsible for numerous contributions to pure 
science knowledge as well as pioneering work in telecommunication 
technology. May 15, 1975. 

BUNCHE, RALPH JOHNSON, HOUSE, 115-125 
Grosvenor Road, Kew Gardens, Queens County. Date 
unknown. 

Home of the distinguished Afro-American diplomat and scholar who 
served as Undersecretary of the United Nations and who received the 
Nobel Peace Prize for his 1949 contribution to peace in the Middle 
East. May 11, 1976. 

CENTRAL SYNAGOGUE, 646-652 Lexington Avenue, 
New York, New York County. 1872, Henry Fernback. 

Gothic in plan, Moorish- Revival in detail, it is one of the best pre- 
served buildings in New York. May 15, 1975. 

CHRYSLER BUILDING, 405 Lexington Avenue, New 



17 



NEW YORK 



York, Manhattan County. 1928-1930, William Van 
Allen. 

Built for Walter Chrysler in "Style Moderne", the building illus- 
trates the machine age in architecture. December 8, 1976. 

CONKLING, ROSCOE, HOUSE, 3 Rutgers Park, Utica, 
Oneida County, c. 1824. 

New York home (c. 1863-88) of the Senator and political boss. 
Gained control of New York's Republican machine in 1870 and 
caused a bitter rift in the party for nearly a decade. May 15, 1975. 

COOK, WILL MARION, HOUSE, 221 West 138th 
Street, New York, New York County. 1891. 

Home of the early 20th century black composer whom "Duke" Elling- 
ton called, "Themasterof all masters of our people." May 11, 1976. 

DAKOTA APARTMENTS, 1 West 72nd Street, New 
York, Manhattan County. 1880-1884. 

One of the earliest large scale apartment houses, it was designed by 
Henry J. Hardenbergh, architect of the Plaza Hotel. December 8, 
1976. 

DRAPER, JOHN W., HOUSE, Draper Park, 407 Broad- 
way, Hastings-on-Hudson, Westchester County, c. 

1840. 

Well-known mid-1 9th century scientist who, in addition to signifi- 
cant contributions to physics and chemistry, also wrote important 
works in intellectual history. May 15, 1975. 

ELLINGTON, EDWARD KENNEDY "DUKE/' RESI- 
DENCE, 935 St. Nicholas Avenue, Apartment 4A, New 
York, New York County. Date unknown. 

Long-term residence of "Duke" Ellington, regarded by critics as the 
most creative Afro-American composer of the 20th century. May 1 1, 
1976. 

FISH, HAMILTON, HOUSE, 21 Stuyvesant Street, New 
York City, New York County. 1804. 

Residence (1808-C.1838) of President Grant's Secretary of State. 
During his 8-year tenure managed an exceptional foreign policy, and 
added stability to a demoralized administration. May 15, 1975. 

GENERAL ELECTRIC RESEARCH LABORATORY, 
Schenectady, Schenectady County. 1900. 

Recognized as the first industrial research facility in the United States, 
the General Electric Research Laboratory since 1 900 has made major 
contributions to scientific knowledge, especially in the areas of physics 
and chemistry. May 15, 1975. 

GRAND CENTRAL TERMINAL, 71-105 East 42nd 
Street, New York, Manhattan County. 1902-1913, 
Warren and Wetmore, Reed and Stem. 

The greatest head station remaining in America, it is also a triumph 
of planning and engineering. December 8, 1976. 

HALL, JAMES, OFFICE, Lincoln Park, Albany, Albany 
County. 1852. 



18 



NEW YORK 



In this office, designed by Calbert Vaux and Andrew Jackson Down- 
ing, ]ames Hall conducted the geological research which made him one 
of the country's best known 19th century geologists. December 8, 
1976. 

HAYNES, LEMUEL, HOUSE, Route 149, South 
Granville, Washington County. 1793. 

Later-day home of the first ordained black minister in the United 
States and the first black minister to a white congregation. May 15, 
1975. 

HENSON, MATTHEW, RESIDENCE, Dunbar Apart- 
ments, 246 West 150th Street, New York County. 1928. 

Later-day home of the black explorer who served as an assistant to 
Robert E. Peary and whose best known achievements came in 1909 
when be became the first man to reach the North Pole. May 15, 
1975. 

JOHNSON, JAMES WELDON, RESIDENCE, 187 West 
135th Street, New York, New York County, c. 1900. 

From 1915 to 1938 the home of the versatile black composer of 
popular songs, poet, writer, general secretary of the NAACP, and 
civil rights activist. May 11, 1976. 

LANGMUIR, IRVING, HOUSE, 1176 Stratford Road, 
Schenectady, Schenectady County. 1900. 

From 1919 to 1957 the home of distinguished General Electric 
chemist and inventor who received the 1934 Nobel Prize in chemistry 
for his work in surface kinetics. January 7, 1976. 

McKAY, CLAUDE, RESIDENCE, 180 West 135th 
Street, New York, New York County. 1931. 

From 1941 to 1 946 the residence of the black poet and writer often 
called the father of the "Harlem Renaissance." December 8, 1976. 

MILLS, FLORENCE, HOUSE, 220 West 135th Street, 
New York, New York County. 1886. 

Home of the popular black singer who in the 1920 's achieved stardom 
on Broadway and in Europe, thus becoming a symbol of success for 
black Americans. December 8, 1976. 

NEW YORK AMSTERDAM NEWS BUILDING, 2293 
Seventh Avenue, New York, New York County. Date 
unknown. 

For years home of one of America's best known black newspapers, the 
pages of which have historically reflected the interests and concerns of 
black Americans. May 11, 1976. 

OLD NEW YORK COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 52 
Chambers Street, New York, New York County. 1862-c. 
1885. 

The Old New York County Courthouse symbolizes the Tweed Ring. 
It is a classic in the annals of American graft and corruption. A 
monument to the machinations of William Many "Boss" Tweed, 
who pocketed $9 million from its construction. May 11, 1976. 



19 



NEW YORK 

PRUDENTIAL (GUARANTY) BUILDING, Church and 
Pearl Streets, Buffalo, Erie County. 1895. 

The last collaborative effort of Dankmar Adler and Louis Sullivan; 
the Prudential is a triumph of early skyscraper design. May 15, 
1975. 

ROBESON, PAUL, RESIDENCE, 555 Edgecomb Ave- 
nue, New York, New York County. 1916. 

Residence of the famous black actor and singer who in the 1 940's and 
1950's suffered public condemnation for his political sympathies, but 
who was widely acclaimed for his artistic talents. December 8, 1976. 

ROBINSON, JOHN ROOSEVELT 'JACKIE/' HOUSE, 
5224 Tilden Street, Brooklyn, Kings County, c. 1915. 

Home of the baseball player who in 1 947 became the first black to play 
in the major leagues, thus breaking the color barrier to full black 
participation in professional sports. May 11, 1976. 

ROCKEFELLER, JOHN D., ESTATE, Pocantico Hills, 
Westchester County. 1909. 

Estate of one of America's most famous and controversial magnates, 
who is best remembered for his organizational genius in industry and 
for the scale and organization of his philanthropic activities. May 1 1, 
1976. 

SAILORS' SNUG HARBOR, Richmond Terrace, New 
Brighton, Staten Island, Richmond County, 1833-1895. 

Large Greek Revival complex for aged sailors. Early central block 
designed by Minard Lafever. December 8, 1976. 

SAINT GEORGES EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 3rd Ave- 
nue and East 1st Street, New York, New York County. 
1856. 

Home church of Harry Thacker Burleigh, black composer, arranger, 
and singer, who helped establish the Negro spiritual as an integral 
part of American culture. December 8, 1976. 

SAINT PATRICK'S CATHEDRAL, Fifth Avenue 
between East 50th and East 51st Street, New York, Man- 
hattan County. 1858-1878, James Renwick, Jr. 

Climaxing Renwick 's career, the cathedral is the first large-scale 
Medieval church in America. December 8, 1976. 

TILDEN, SAMUEL J., HOUSE, 14-15 Gramercy Park 
South, New York, New York County, c. 1835, facade 
altered 1874. 

Occupied today by the National Arts Club, it was the residence (c. 
1860-c. 1885) of the central figure in the disputed Tilden-Hayes 
election of 1876. An outstanding reformer, he defeated the Tweed 
Ring and the Canal Ring. Important Victorian-Gothic building. 
May 11, 1976. 

TRINITY CHURCH AND GRAVEYARD, Broadway at 
Wall Street, New York, Manhattan County. 1846. 

Oldest Episcopal church in New York City; designed by Richard 
Upjohn. Buried here are Alexander Hamilton, Robert Fulton, and 
William Bradford. December 8, 1976. 



20 






NEW YORK / NORTH CAROLINA / OHIO 

UNITED STATES CUSTOM HOUSE, Bowling Green, 
New York, New York County. 1900-1907, Cass Gilbert. 

Large Beaux Arts structure embellished with sculpture by Daniel 
Chester French, murals by Reginald Marsh. December 8, 1976. 

VILLA LEWARO, North Broadway, Greenburgh, West- 
chester County. 1918. 

Designed by the noted black architect Vertner Woodson Tandy for 
Madame C. J. Walker, successful cosmetics manufacturer, Villa 
Lewaro illustrates the achievements of Negroes in both architecture 
and business. May 11, 1976. 



North Carolina 



DANIELS, JOSEPHUS, HOUSE, 1520 Caswell Street, 
Raleigh, Wake County, c. 1920. 

A truly great Secretary of the Navy (1913-1921), he significantly 
reformed navy policies by introducing schooling for illiterate sailors, 
vocational training, opening the Naval Academy to enlisted men, and 
reforming the naval prison system. December 8, 1976. 

NORTH CAROLINA MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE 
COMPANY, 114-116 West Parish Street, Durham, 
Durham County. 1921. 

Home office of the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company, 
a black-managed enterprise founded in 1898 which achieved finan- 
cial success in an age of Jim Crow. May 15, 1975. 

UNION TAVERN, Main Street, Milton, Caswell 
County, c. 1800. 

Workshop studio of Thomas Day, early 1 9th century free black cabi- 
net maker who achieved recognition for the superior quality of his 
craftsmanship. May 15, 1975. 



Ohio 



CLEVELAND ARCADE, 401 Euclid Avenue, Cleve- 
land, Cuyahoga County. 1888-1890, John Eisenman and 
George H. Smith. 

One of the few glass covered shopping areas in America — 
engineering marvel. May 15, 1975. 

KIRTLAND TEMPLE, 9020 Chillicothe Road, Kirt- 
land, Lake County. 1833-1838. 

A vernacular building with Federal and Gothic Revival elements 
built by the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. 
December 8, 1976. 






21 



OHIO / OKLAHOMA 

LANGSTON, JOHN MERCER, HOUSE, 207 East 
College Street, Oberlin, Lorain County. 1855. 

Home of the first black American elected to public office (1855). He 
later served the Freedman's Bureau, was first dean of the Howard Law 
School, and was minister to Haiti. May 15, 1975. 

McKINLEY, WILLIAM, TOMB, Westlawn Cemetery, 
Canton, Stark County. 1907. 

Resting place of the 25 th President of the United States. His election in 
1894 began an era of Republican dominance and marked American 
expansion in the Caribbean and Far East. May 15, 1975. 

PLUM STREET TEMPLE (ISAAC M. WISE TEMPLE), 
Eighth and Plum Streets, Cincinnati, Hamilton County. 
1865-1866. 

One of the best preserved Moorish-Revival buildings of the 1 9th cen- 
tury, designed by James Keys Wilson. May 15, 1975. 

RICKENBACKER, CAPTAIN EDWARD V., HOUSE, 
1334 E. Livingston Avenue, Columbus, Franklin 
County, c. 1895. 

Residence (1895-1 922) of World War 1 flying ace. Flew in first ail- 
American combat mission. In six months shot down 26 German air- 
craft making himself the idol of a generation of American youth. May 
11, 1976. 

TAFT MUSEUM, 316 Pike Street, Cincinnati, Hamil- 
ton County, c. 1820. 

Formerly the Charles P. Taft Home, the magnificent collections dis- 
played there now belong to the city. It is one of the earliest grand man- 
sions in Ohio. January 7, 1976. 

TYTUS, JOHN B., HOUSE, 300 South Main Street, 
Middletown, Butler County. 1868. 

Life-long home of the inventor of a practical hot, wide-strip, con- 
tinuous steel rolling process, which contributed significantly to the 
growth of the steel industry. May 11, 1976. 



Oklahoma 



BOLEY HISTORIC DISTRICT, Boley, Okfuskee 
County. 1903. 

Largest of the Negro towns established in Oklahoma to provide black 
Americans with the opportunity for self government in an era of white 
supremacy and segregation. May 15, 1975. 

101 RANCH HISTORIC DISTRICT, Marland, Kay 
County. 1879. 

Large cattle ranch and home base of the 101 Wild West Show which 
featured Bill Pickett, well-known black cowboy who invented steer 
wrestling and who was elected to the Cowboy Hall of Fame. May 15, 
1975. 



22 



Pennsylvania 



ACHESON, EDWARD G., HOUSE, 908 Main Street, 
Monongahela, Washington County. 1870's. 

Home and also the site where Acheson in 1891 invented carborun- 
dum, at the time the hardest known artificial substance and since then 
widely used in industry. May 11, 1976. 

ALLEGHENY COUNTY COURTHOUSE AND JAIL, 
Fifth, Grant, Ross, and Diamond Streets, Pittsburgh, 
Allegheny County. 1884-1888. 

One of H.H. Richardson's last works in the Romanesque Revival 
style, it is considered one of his outstanding works. May 11,1976. 

ATHENAEUM, 219 South 6th Street, Philadelphia, 
Philadelphia County. 1845-1847, John Notman. 

One of the first Italian palazzos that created a new style in America. 
December 8, 1976. 

CAMERON, SIMON, HOUSE, 219 South Front Street, 
Harrisburg, Dauphin County. 1764-1766, enlarged c. 
1863. 

Residence (c. 1863-1889) of master "spoilsman" and Secretary of 
War under Lincoln. Built the model patronage system in Pennsyl- 
vania and installed the anti-reform Republican "Stalwarts" as the 
dominant faction in the party from 1872 to 1890. May 15, 1975. 

COPE, EDWARD D., HOUSE, 2102 Pine Street, Phila- 
delphia, Philadelphia County, c. 1880. 

Home of one of America's most prolific and creative 19th century 
geologists and paleontologists. May 15, 1975. 

DELAWARE CANAL, Parallels Delaware River from 
Easton to Bristol, Northampton and Bucks County. 
1827. 

Approximately 60 miles of original canal that illustrates the canal 
building era in the history of American transportation. December 8, 
1976. 

DUDLEY, CHARLES B., HOUSE, 802 Lexington Ave- 
nue, Altoona, Blair County. 1880 / s. 

Home of theY ale-trained chemist who in 1875 became the first scien- 
tist employed by industry and marked the beginning of industrial 
research and development. May 11, 1976. 

FAIRMOUNT WATER WORKS, East Bank of Schuykill 
River near Art Museum, Philadelphia, Philadelphia 
County. 1812-1822, Frederick Graff. 

The first municipal water works to use paddle wheels to pump water 
and the first to replace them by turbine engines. An architectural gem, 
the sculpture of William Rush enhanced the buildings. May 11, 
1976. 



23 



PENNSYLVANIA 

FALLINGWATER, West of Pennsylvania Route 381 
Mill Run, Fayette County. 1936, 1939. 

Sometimes called "The most famous modern house" it is a master- 
work of Frank Lloyd Wright. May 11, 1976. 

GEMEINHAUS-DE SCHWEINITZ, LEWIS DAVID, 
RESIDENCE, West Church Street, Bethlehem, 
Northampton County. 1733. 

Birthplace and later long-time home of a Moravian minister and 
naturalist who in the early 19th century made significant contribu- 
tions to botany. May 15, 1975. 

HARPER, FRANCES ELLEN WATKINS, HOUSE, 1006 
Bainbridge Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County. 
Date unknown. 

Home of the black writer and social activist who participated in the 
19th century abolitionist, Negro rights, woman's suffrage, and tem- 
perance movements. December 8, 1976. 

HARRISBURG STATION AND TRAINSHED, 
Aberdeen Street, Harrisburg, Dauphin County. 1885- 
1887. 

The Harrisburg trainshed is one of the earliest extant examples of the 
Fink roof truss, a form of major significance in the history of 
American industrial building. December 8, 1976. 

HILL-KEITH-PHYSICK HOUSE, 321 South Fourth 
Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County. 1786. 

Home of Philip Syng Physick, late 18th and early 19th century 
Philadelphia physician who has been called the father of American 
surgery. January 7, 1976. 

MEMORIAL HALL, West Fairmount Park, Phila- 
delphia, Philadelphia County. 1876. 

The only large building remaining from the 1876 Centennial 
Exhibition; Herman Schwartzmann was the architect. December 8, 
1976. 

PENNSYLVANIA ACADEMY OF THE FINE ARTS, 
Broad and Cherry Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia 
County. 1871-1876, Frank Furness and George Hewitt. 

The best preserved of Furness' exhuberani Victorian structures. May 
15, 1975. 

PHILADELPHIA CITY HALL, Penn Square, Broad and 
Market Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County. 
1871-1881, John McArthur, Jr., and Thomas U. Walter. 

Largest and most elaborate city hall in America. Derived in style from 
Paris' New Louvre, the sculpture is by Alexander Milne Calder and 
assistants. December 8, 1976. 

PHILADELPHIA SAVINGS FUND SOCIETY 
BUILDING, 12 South 12th Street, Philadelphia, Phila- 
delphia County. 1932, George Howe and William 
Lescage. 

Philadelphia Savings Fund Society Building is the most important 



24 



PENNSYLVANIA / RHODE ISLAND 



skyscraper in America built between the time of the Chicago School 
and the International Style of the 1950' s. December 8, 1976. 



QUAY, MATTHEW S., HOUSE, 205 College Avenue, 
Beaver, Beaver County, c. 1865. 

Residence(c. 1 8 74-1 904) of prominent leader of Republican machine 
politics. Republican National Chairman in 1888, he organized and 
managed Benjamin Harrison's successful campaign. May 15, 1975. 

READING TERMINAL AND TRAINSHED, 1115-1141 
Market Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County. 
1891-1893. 

Largest single-span arched roof trainshed in the world; the work of 
Joseph M. Wilson and a monument in the history of civil engi- 
neering. December 8, 1976. 

SMITHFIELD STREET BRIDGE, Smithfield Street at 
the Monogahela River, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County. 
1883-1889. 

One of the first steel truss bridges in the United States, the Smithfield 
Street Bridge is an important structure in the history of American 
civil engineering. May 11, 1976. 



TANNER, HENRY O., HOMESITE, 2903 West 
Diamond Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County. 
Date unknown. 

Boyhood home of the late 19th and early 20th century black ex- 
patriate painter whose work earned recognition in Europe and the 
United States. May 11, 1976. 

UNITED STATES NAVAL ASYLUM, Grays Ferry Ave- 
nue at 24th Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County. 
1827-1833, addition 1844; William Strickland. 

Greek Revival in style, this structure was the first Naval Academy 
before Annapolis was established (1845). January 7, 1976. 



Rhode Island 



ALDRICH, NELSON W., HOUSE, 110 Benevolent 
Street, Providence, Providence County, c. 1821-1827. 

Residence (187 8-1 9 15) of Senate "boss" who maintained virtual veto 
power over legislation. Pressed his view that business and government 
should combine to lead the country. December 8, 1976. 

ARCADE, 130 Westminster Street and 65 Weyboseet 
Street, Providence, Providence County. 1827-1829. 

Designed by Russell Warren, this elegant Greek Revival commercial 
structure imitates European business arcades. May 11, 1976. 



25 



RHODE ISLAND / SOUTH CAROLINA 

BELLEVUE AVENUE HISTORIC DISTRICT, Bellevue 
Avenue from the Casino to Easton's Beach, Bailey's 
Beach, Coggeshall, Rovernsky, Bancroft, Ruggles, 
Bateman Avenues and Perry Street, Pope and Bowery, 
and Jones Street, Newport County. 

One of the most spectacular assemblages of American architecture 
from its beginning to the present. May 11, 1976. 

FORT ADAMS, Fort Adams Road at Harrison Avenue, 
Newport, Newport County. 1824-1857. 

Superlative illustration of American military engineering and tech- 
nology in the 19th century which demonstrates the defense recom- 
mendations of both Bernard and Endicott Boards. December 8, 1976. 

LIPPITT, GOVERNOR HENRY, HOUSE, 199 Hope 
Street, Providence, Providence County. 1862-1865, 
Henry Childs. 

A beautifully preserved Italian Villa built by the one-time Governor 
of Rhode Island. May 11, 1976. 

OCEAN DRIVE NEWPORT HISTORIC DISTRICT, 
Bellevue Avenue, Coggeshall, Ocean Avenue, Almy 
Pond, Ruggles and Carroll Avenues, Harrison and Hali- 
don Avenues, Chastelux and Wellington Avenues to the 
harbor, Newport County. 

Includes early farms and large summer homes as well as natural land- 
scape. May 11, 1976. 



South Carolina 



CHAPELLE ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, 1530 
Harden Street, Columbia, Richland County. 1925. 

One of the finest works of John Anderson Lankford, a pioneer black 
architect who helped gain recognition for Afro-American architects 
among the architectural community. December 8, 1976. 

SOUTH CAROLINA STATE HOUSE, Capitol Square, 
Columbia, Richland County. 1851-1907. 

Fine example of neoclassical architure, it served a key role in the "com- 
promise of 1876" which signaled the end of military reconstruction of 
the South. May 11, 1976. 

VESEY, DENMARK, HOUSE, 56 Bull Street, Charles- 
ton, Charleston County, c. 1820. 

Residence of a free black Charleston carpenter whose 1822 plans for a 
slave insurrection illustrated Negro resistance to slavery. May 11, 
1976. 



16 



Tennessee 



NASHVILLE UNION STATION AND TRAINSHED, 
10th Avenue South at Broadway, Nashville, Davidson 
County. 1898-1900. 

Largest single-span, gable-roof trainshed in America structure, the 
Nashville trainshed represents the ultimate development of the first 
phase of trainshed construction and is a significant contribution to the 
evolution of modern building methods. December 8, 1976. 

RHEA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, Market Street 
between 2nd and 3rd Avenues, Dayton, Rhea County. 
1890-1891. 

Scene of the controversial and widely publicized Scopes "Monkey" 
Trial in 1925. The trial represented a clash between fundamentalist 
and modernist thought in science, theology, philosophy, and politics. 
December 8, 1976. 

YORK, ALVIN CULLOM, FARM, U.S. 127 vicinity Pall 
Mall, Fentress County. 1922. 

Residence (1922-1949) of renowned hero of World War 1. Single- 
handedly killed 25 of the enemy, took 132 prisoners and destroyed 3 5 
machine guns. Won the Congressional Medal of Honor and mag- 
nified his legend by refusing to capitalize on it. May 1 1, 1976. 



Texas 



EAST END HISTORIC DISTRICT, Broadway, Ball, 
19th to 16th, Market Streets, Galveston, Galveston 
County. 1840 , s-1920 / s. 

A collection of 1 9th century residential structures including the ornate 
Bishop's Palace (1887-1893) by Nicholas J. Clayton, architect. 
May 11, 1976. 

FORT SAM HOUSTON, San Antonio, Bexar County. 
1876. 

Army's principal supply base in the Southwest. Supplied the "Rough 
Riders" in 1898 and Pershing's Mexican campaign in 1916. Signal 
Corps' aviation section established here. May 15, 1975. 

GARNER, JOHN NANCE, HOUSE, 333 North Park 
Street, Uvalde, Uvalde County. Early 20th century. 

Residence (1920-57) of one of the most influential U.S. Represen- 
tatives from 1902 to 1932. As Speaker of the House he led coopera- 
tive efforts with Hoover to combat the depression. December 8, 1976. 



17 



TEXAS / UTAH 



HANGAR 9, Brooks Air Force Base, San Antonio, Bexar 
County. 1918. 

Only surviving hangar of the U.S. Army Signal Corps Aviation Sec- 
tion. Symbolizes the early army effort to create an effective air arm. 
December 8, 1976. 



RAYBURN, SAMUEL T., HOUSE, U.S. 82 vicinity 
Bonham, Fannin County. 1904. 

"Mr. Sam" was Speaker of the House>of Representatives for 1 7 years, 
twice the tenure of any other. His astute political sense preserved the 
delicate balance between the factions of the Democratic Party. May 
11, 1976. 

STRAND HISTORIC DISTRICT, Avenue A, 20th 
Street, Avenue D, and Passenger Depot, Galveston, 
Galveston County, 1850's to 1900. 

A business district that developed from the port activities creating a 
group of 19th century commercial structures. May 11, 1976. 

U.S.S. TEXAS, San Jacinto Battleground State Park, 22 
mi. east of Houston, Harris County. 1914. 

Only surviving warship of her class and only surviving battleship 
having reciprocating steam engines. Served in both World Wars and 
at the Normandy landing. December 8, 1976. 



Utah 



FORT DOUGLAS, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County. 
1864-1931. 

Became the site of the occupation army situated to maintain Federal 
authority in the Mormon Territory inthe!860's. May 15, 1975. 

OLD CITY HALL, State Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake 
County. 1864-1866. 

Municipal building and Utah Territorial Capitol until 1894. A 
focal point for the turbulent confrontation with Mormon Territorial 
government and reassertion of the primacy of the National Govern- 
ment. May 15, 1975. 

SMOOT, REED O., HOUSE, 183 East 100 South, Provo, 
Utah County. 1892. 

Residence (1892-1941) of Senator and staunch advocate of the protec- 
tive tariff. The Hawley-Smoot Tariff of 1930 raised import duties to 
an all-time high and invited economic retaliation by other nations thus 
aggravating the depression. December 8, 1976. 



28 



Virginia 



BANNEKER, BANJAMIN: SW-9 INTERMEDIATE 
BOUNDARY STONE, 18th and Van Buren Streets, 
Arlington, Arlington County. 1792. 

This boundary stone commemorates the accomplishments of Ben- 
jamin Banneker who helped survey the city of Washington, D.C., and 
who was perhaps the most famous black man in Colonial America. 
May 11, 1976. 

DREW, CHARLES RICHARD, HOUSE, 2505 First 
Street South, Arlington, Arlington County. Date 
unknown. 

From 19 20 to 1939 the home address of the noted black physician and 
teacher who is best remembered for his pioneer work in discovering 
means to preserve blood plasma. May 11, 1976. 

GLASS, CARTER, HOUSE, 605 Clay Street, Lynch- 
burg, Lynchburg County. 1827. 

Residence (1907-1923) of the most influential shaper of American 
financial policy in the 20th century. Author of Glass-Owen Act of 
1913 establishing the Federal Reserve System. December 8, 1976. 

MAIN STREET STATION AND TRAINSHED, 1520 
East Main Street, Richmond City. 1900-1901. 

The Main Street Station is an example of the Ecole des Beaux Arts 
influence on American building while the trainshed, one of the last 
gable-roofed trainsheds in America, is significant in the history of 
American engineering. December 8, 1976. 

MITCHELL, GENERAL WILLIAM "BILLY", HOUSE, 
State Route 626, 1/2 mi. S. of Middleburg, Loudoun 
County. 1826; wing 1925. 

Residence (1926-1936) of the dominant figure in American avia- 
tion from 1919 to World War U. Foresaw the strategic value of air 
power. Promulgation of his ideas ledtohiscourtmartial. December 8, 
1976. 

WALKER, MAGGIE LENA, HOUSE, 110A, East Leigh 
Street, Richmond, c. 1909. 

In 1 903 Maggie Lena Walker, a black woman, founded the success- 
ful Saint Luke Penny Savings Bank, thus becoming the first woman to 
establish and head a bank. May 15, 1975. 



Washington 



FORT WORDEN, Cherry and W. Streets, Port 
Townsend, Jefferson County, c. 1885-1921. 

Fortification which illustrates the Endicott system of coastal defenses. 
An unaltered Endicott installation built on previously unfortified 
ground, making no concessions to older works. December 8, 1976. 



29 



West Virginia 



WHEELING SUSPENSION BRIDGE, 10th and Main 
Streets, Wheeling, Ohio County. 1849. 

Oldest major long-span suspension bridge in the world with a span of 
more than 1,000 feet, the Wheeling Suspension Bridge is possibly the 
Nation's most significant extant antebellum engineering structure. Its 
construction established American leadership in suspension bridge 
construction. May 15, 1975. 



Wisconsin 



ADMINISTRATION BUILDING AND RESEARCH 
TOWER, S.C. JOHNSON COMPANY, 1525 Howe 
Street, Racine, Racine County. 1936-1939, tower added 
1947. 

One of the most original systems of cantilever-slab construction, it was 
designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. January 7, 1976. 

BRADLEY HOUSE, 106 North Prospect Street, Madi- 
son, Dane County. 1909. 

Designed by Louis Sullivan and George Elmslie, one of two residences 
created by Sullivan (Babson House, Riverside, Illinois) just after his 
peak as a skyscraper architect. January 7, 1976. 

FARMERS' AND MERCHANTS' UNION BANK, 
Broadway and James Street, Columbus, Columbia 
County. 1919. 

Louis Sullivan designed entirely and also supervised construction of 
the bank. One of two Sullivan buildings in Wisconsin (Bradley House 
in Madison). January 7, 1976. 

TALIESIN, two miles south Spring Green, Wyoming 
Township, Iowa County. Complex built 1902-1938. 

The second great center of Frank Lloyd Wright's activity (after Oak 
Park), it is the summer home and studio of the Taliesin Fellowship. 
January 7, 1976. 



Wyoming 



FORT D. A. RUSSELL, Cheyenne, Laramie County. 
1885, addition 1912. 

Strategically located on the transcontinental railroad, it was used to 
protect workers for the Union Pacific Railroad. Home of the Pawnee 
scout battalion in 1871. Participated in the Sioux War of 1876. 
May 15, 1975. 



30 NPS 182 



UNIUERSITY OF GEORGIA LIBRARIES 

National historic landmarks = 
I 29.2:L 23/4/supp. 



3 ELDfl D 1*141 743E 





DATE DUE 












































































































































DEMCO 38-29 


7 







UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA 

4 1977 

UBHARiES 

DEPOSITORY 



As the Nation's principal conservation agency, the Department 
of the Interior has responsibility for most of our nationally 
owned public lands and natural resources. This includes fos- 
tering the wisest use of our land and water resources, pro- 
tecting our fish and wildlife, preserving the environmental and 
cultural values of our national parks and historical places, and 
providing for the enjoyment of life through outdoor recreation. 
The Department assesses our energy and mineral resources and 
works to assure that their development is in the best interests of 
all our people. The Department also has a major responsibility 
for American Indian reservation communities and for people 
who live in Island Territories under U.S. administration.